Streamers and Punches 1: Driving Miss Ostinato

Brand new show! Streamers and Punches looks at Spotify, new commissions for film composers, an article about composer tech talk, and a current trend in scoring we call the “Running Strings.”


download video

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

download audio

If you enjoy the show, please subscribe on iTunes or your favorite podcast service using the links to the right.
This week’s panel:
This week’s topics include:
  • We take a look at Spotify’s new service in the US.
  • John Williams has a new quartet commission; Danny Elfman writes music for Cirque du Soleil.
  • Film Music Magazine has an article by Jay Asher detailing the ever-increasing technical vocabulary that composers need to adopt in today’s film composing industry.
  • A closer look at the trend “Running Strings,” a texture style attributed originally to Clint Mansell’s Lux Aeterna from Requiem for a Dream, and used in several other scores: Batman Begins, Inception, Transformers, Tron Legacy, Thor, and Green Lantern.
If you like…

Don Davis’s score to The Matrix (Amazon MP3iTunes), you might like Harmonielehre by John Adams (Amazon MP3iTunes).

This entry was posted in podcast, Streamers and Punches and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.
  • http://davidmacdonaldmusic.com Dave

    Want running strings throughout a whole feature film? Watch The Bourne Identity. It NEVER stops.

    • http://williamwithem.com Bill Withem

      Our alternate title was almost Running With Strings (instead of Scissors), but I caved for Kevin’s idea.

  • http://sammerciers.com sam

    Fantastic job guys. Keep up the good work.

  • Pingback: Streamers and Punches: Episode 1 « Jeff Arwady()

  • http://www.matthewschoendorff.com Matt Schoendorff

    I’d bet good money that a lot of the string ostinato phenomenon has some roots in the electronica and trance genres, which are relics of the same technology that is used to create modern film scores.

    Just a thought.

  • http://www.rogerwpetersen.com Roger W. Petersen

    Nice episode! Keep it up! I look forward to future episodes.