Music is Hard 39: Fatigue

This week:
Tim and Dave talk about too much of a good thing. Can you listen to too much music? What do you do when your ears and mind get fatigued? How might we avoid fatiguing our audiences?

Link:
NY Times: Where the Avant-Garde Is Child’s Play

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  • Hey guys – great to hear the new episode and the conversation about the epic piece continue. I think that discussion could go on for ten more episodes at least – lol. I do think however that opera is a whole different thing, and that the original discussion was more about the epic “concert” piece, and not about opera.

    I appreciated the discussion about fatigue. I’ve been to several Guitar Foundation of America conferences (this is analogous to the NASA conferences for classical guitarists), and I’ve experienced the same thing. Running/hosting 2 music podcasts myself, I’m very used to listening to a bunch of music all the time. But something about hearing it all live – even though it might be all music you love, played by artists you admire – it’s exhausting! Also, Tim’s assertion that the SCA conference was the “worst case scenario” made me laugh out loud.

    One more thing – a topic I would love to hear discussed, and this is obviously more for Dave, although it could apply to anyone. I, like you guys, have been through the University music system – all the way. My question is, do you guys think it’s difficult for a music student, going through undergrad, masters and doctorate, to hold on to their own “musical identities”. What I mean by this is, when we first go into school, we all have music and artists that we love and that essentially fired our passions and brought us to study music. As a composer, I found it challenging to take everything in and be open minded to everything I was learning, while still holding on to who I was as a musician deep down. I’m not sure if I’m making my question very clear. Anyway – if you’re ever short on something to discuss – perhaps try to decode what I just said – lol.