Tag Archives: orchestra

Music is Hard 33: Ritual

This week:
What value are the customs we have developed for presenting music? How does our ritual help or harm the concert experience? How can we change the way we present concerts? Is it possible to alter such a thoroughly established ritual?

Link:
Christine Linial: A Concertgoer’s Guide

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SoundNotion 17: It’s Always Sunny in East Lansing

Topics include streaming opera performances, the future of American orchestras, rethinking digital distribution, the existential crisis of glockenspiel vibrato, and more.


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This week’s panel:


This week’s topics include:

  • James Levine is withdrawing from a slew of upcoming performances.
  • Are streaming opera performances really a good idea?
  • WQXR brought together some luminaries to ponder the future of American orchestras. (And Ray Hair embarassed himself and musicians everywhere.)
  • Detroit Symphony announces a gamble on lower ticket prices.
  • The Rethink Music Conference rethinks distribution models and intellectual property issues.
  • Ty Forquer helps Sam and Dave settle an old score about the existence of glockenspiel vibrato.
  • Interested in an orchestra administration career? Adaptistration’s Drew McManus wants to help you find a gig.


Pick of the week:

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SoundNotion – Episode 8 “Seventeen Alto Saxophones”


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If you enjoy the show, please subscribe on iTunes or your favorite podcast service using the links to the right.


This week’s panel:


This week’s topics include:

  • Matt Schoendorff joins us to talk about his experiences writing for wind ensembles and young musicians.
  • The ongoing saga of the Detroit Symphony continues. The musicians have offered to return to work if DSO administrators agrees to binding arbitration.
  • As of this recording, there has been no official response to the musicians’ offer.
  • Also, the DSO is losing musicians to other orchestras, including it’s entire percussion section.
  • Ben Rosen published an editorial on the Huffington Post this week about the economics of classical music.
  • An National Endowment for the Arts study suggests that while audiences are not attending performances or museums very much, they are interacting with the arts on the web. Remind you of anyone?
  • Trent Reznor (of Nine Inch Nails) and Atticus Ross won an Oscar for their score to the Social Network.
  • Steve Reich is about to turn 75. Happy birthday Steve!
  • Philip Glass is starting a new arts festival in Carmel Valley, California.
  • James Levine resigns his position with the Boston Symphony due to health reasons, allowing him to focus on his duties at the Met.
  • 2011 is the Year of the Composer, but only in Vermont. Some restrictions apply. Void where prohibited.
  • Drew McManus of Adaptistration will be joining us next week to talk about the business side of orchestras in general, and the Detroit Symphony in particular.
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SoundNotion – Episode 5 “Can You Say ‘La Jolla’?”

Topics include Bachtrack’s report on programming in 2010, the New York Philharmonic’s omission of female composers in the coming season, NY Times columnist Max Frankel’s take on John Adams’s Nixon in China, and more.


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If you enjoy the show, please subscribe on iTunes or your favorite podcast service using the links to the right.


This week’s panel:


This week’s topics include:

  • Yet another DSO update. The orchestra threatened to cancel the remaining four months of the season. The musicians called their bluff.
  • Governer Sam Brownback (R) of Kansas has signed an executive order eliminating the Kansas Arts Commission, a state-level analog of the NEA.
  • Bachtrack reported the most performed works and composers on orchestral concerts and operas in 2010. Some results were pleasantly surprising. Others were not.
  • The hashtag #dwg (dead white guys) has blown up Twitter over the last week or so, stemming from the complete lack of female composers on the New York Philharmonic’s 2011-2012 season.
  • The San Francisco Contemporary Music Players have a new artistic director, percussionist Steven Schick.
  • Max Frankel thinks you should wait until the year 2111 to write that opera about Egypt’s recent revolution (and that John Adams should have waited a bit longer to write Nixon in China).
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